Two spices you have in your cupboard could help save your life

A typical rummage around your spice cupboard usually yields two things: a realization that your kitchen surfaces are now overrun with spices you forgot you even had, and a feeling of bemusement as to why you have six packets of ground black pepper.

Sometimes, though, you open the cupboard and a spice decides it wants revenge for weeks and months of neglect, and jumps out at you. You try and catch it, and it consequently knocks over more spices, creating a domino-effect, Spice-aggedon situation that forces you to get out the vacuum cleaner, making you wish you never bothered.

If you like a little spice in your life, you may also find yourself reorganizing your cupboard from time to time. Upon doing so, it’s always interesting to see how much or how little we actually use specific spices.

Little did you know your much-ignored spice cupboard could also be your alternative pharmacy, providing you with additional remedies for those everyday problems. Perfect for when you’re waiting an hour to book an appointment for the doctor.

Cinnamon and turmeric are the undisputed heroes of your spice rack. The Batman and Robin of the spice world, if you will. Implementing these two into your daily diet can do wonders for your health, you’ll be surprised how far a teaspoon of the stuff goes.

The benefits of cinnamon date back thousands of years to ancient Egyptian civilisation. The medicinal properties still have the same healing effects for our modern day ailments, and can assist in keeping us healthy, particularly for the upcoming winter months.

Cinnamon is known to contain a significant amount of antioxidants, making it super useful as an alternative to ibuprofen. Enough of it in your diet will help reduce pain and swelling in your injuries, not to mention other lingering problems.

If that wasn’t good enough, cinnamon’s antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capabilities can also help those suffering from high blood pressure and the common cold. The quickest way start consuming some would be to put it in your tea.

Having cinnamon tea means your digestion will be better off too. If you are not a fan of tea, put a sprinkle of the stuff onto your cappuccino, instead of chocolate, or you can buy other cinnamon-flavored drinks.

Make sure it’s the actual spice cinnamon and not the syrup, however; the imminent arrival of autumn and winter means cinnamon-based foods are easy to find, but many of them do not actually contain cinnamon. If you want a more substantial cinnamon based diet, add servings to your porridge and granola.

If you’re into your batch cooking, soups should definitely be part of your week’s menu and new cinnamon lifestyle. Soups are easy to make and more importantly, easy to get cinnamon into. Good go-to’s are sweet potato, butternut squash and pumpkin soup.

Turmeric is instantly recognisable in your cupboard, even if the label has fallen off. This golden hued spice, most commonly used in Indian dishes, has equally good medicinal purposes.

Curcumin, something also known for its anti-inflammatory properties, is found in turmeric. Similar to cinnamon, turmeric can be used to help with ailments like arthritis and alleviates digestive issues as well.

Turmeric also works as a natural detox, a word whose meaning has lost its potency in recent years because it’s such a popular buzzword that’s so good at duping us into buying bad products. The compounds in turmeric aide liver function, so there’s no need for all those snake oils anymore!

Turmeric in rice adds all these health benefits, and gives you that Instagram friendly color if you want to take pictures of your health trip. It goes without saying that the spice works well in curries, so find one that suits your taste. Mild or spicy, you’ll find turmeric works well in all.

Adding a teaspoon of turmeric into your daily smoothie or juice is also a good idea. If you’re ever hungover, you can give your liver a boost in no time flat. It can’t do anything about that risky text you sent when you were drunk last night, unfortunately.

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